Star Wars

One Galaxy – Three Games

The Star Wars galaxy is vast. It has been explored in six movies, dozens of novels and cartoon episodes, and hundreds of comics. With the dawn of the Disney Era of Star Wars, this galaxy will be getting fleshed out in even further detail for years to come.

Given the breadth of the Star Wars setting, it’s not surprising that when it took over the license for Star Wars tabletop RPGs, Fantasy Flight Games elected to create three different flavors of the game, all using the same mechanics, but each emphasizing a different aspect of everyone’s favorite far, far away galaxy. Each is set in the interval between episodes IV (A New Hope) and V (The Empire Strikes Back), but creating a campaign set after The Empire Strikes back wouldn’t require much effort using any of these books.

FFG has released boxed beginner sets and a core book for each of the games. The rules for all these games games use destiny points and a set of special dice to drive a narrative approach to task resolution.

Star Wars is oriented toward campaign play. Character specialization and advancement are familiar to anyone who has played a classes-and-levels game, and the narrative mechanics support the system’s overall emphasis on simulating the pulp feel of the movies.

Three of the Things That Make Star Wars Stand Out

  • A Familiar Universe: You’ll be hard-pressed to find someone who isn’t at least familiar with the Star Wars universe, which makes it easy to pitch the game to players, and easy for players to situate themselves in the game world.
  • Special Dice: A set of special dice (included in the boxed set) are used to generate a cinematic success/failure and advantage/disadvantage outcomes from a single roll.
  • Tie-ins: Characters, equipment, NPCs, and storylines from each game can be seamlessly incorporated into the others.

Edge of the Empire

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Han Solo. Lando Calrissian. Boba Fett. Jabba the Hutt. These smugglers, scoundrels, bounty hunters, and crime lords of the grimy, desperate Outer Rim are the kinds of characters that occupy Edge of the Empire. If the grubby side of Star Wars appeals to you, this may be your game. Typical Edge of the Empire adventures include heists, treasure hunts, protection missions, investigations, smuggling runs, and the like.Players can take the role of Bounty Hunters, Colonists, Explorers, Hired Guns, Smugglers, or Technicians. The core rulebook defines three specializations for each career (ex: Bodyguard Hired Gun), so you wind up with 18 character types. Player characters can be Bothan, Droid, Gand, Human, Rodian, Trandoshan, Twi’lek, or Wookie.

Edge of the Empire uses a story mechanic called Obligation. Obligations are debts, favors, or other responsibilities owed by player character. Gamemasters can use Obligations to put pressure on characters, give them access to resources they wouldn’t otherwise have, and introduce new adventures.

The Force plays an ancillary role in Edge of the Empire; the Force-Sensitive Exile specialization can be taken with any career and provides some nifty capabilities, but characters with Force sensitivity are mostly untrained and hiding their talents for fear of being discovered by the Empire.

Free Quickstart Rules

This free 40-page PDF provides four pre-generated characters, the introductory Under a Big Black Sun adventure, and quick-start rules. Download it from Fantasy Flight Games.

The Beginner Game

The Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game boxed set includes a 32-page adventure book, a 48-page rulebook, four pre-generated character folios, a double-sided fold-out map, a pack of Star Wars dice, and tokens to track destiny points, characters, and vehicles.

You can buy it at Amazon.

  • “It’s a great game, but more importantly it’s an ideal introduction to roleplaying.” — Troo Grit
  • “Everyone who played had a blast and they want to play again ASAP.” — Gabe, Penny Arcade

The Core Rulebook

his 448-page book includes everything you need to run a full Edge of the Empire campaign, with the exception of Star Wars dice.

You can buy the Core Rulebook and dice at Amazon.

  • “This is some of the most fun role-playing I’ve had since I can remember. Highly, highly recommended.” — Ben W. Bell, Second Left RPG
  • “Star Wars: Edge of the Empire is a blast. We started playing on a whim, and the game consumed us for over 30 sessions.” — Erik Schmidt, Unpossible Journeys

Age of Rebellion

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Wedge Antilles. Biggs Darklighter. Admiral Ackbar. Mon Motha. Player characters in Age of Rebellion are heroes – whether maneuvering through the corridors of power, blasting at Stormtroopers, or taking down TIE fighters. Typical Age of Rebellion adventures include commando rescues, secret negotiations, spy extractions, scouting operations, and sabotage missions.

Players can take the role of Aces, Commanders, Diplomats, Engineers, Soldiers, or Spies. The core rulebook defines three specializations for each career (ex: Agitator Diplomat), so there are 18 character types. Player characters can be Bothan, Droid, Duros, Gran, Human, Ithorian, Mon Calamari, or Sullustan.

Age of Rebellion uses the Duty story mechanic. Duty defines a character’s motivation in fighting for the Rebellion. Duty applies to both individuals and groups, and as characters accumulate Duty points for their heroics in service to the Rebellion, it can confer access to additional resources, affect morale, and have other effects.

The Force appears in Age of Rebellion, but only as a supporting element. The Force-Sensitive Emergent specialization can be taken with any career, but as with Edge of the Empire, this does not confer Jedi status or the mastery of the Force that comes with it.

The Beginner Game

The Star Wars: Age of Rebellion Beginner Game boxed set includes a 32-page adventure book, a 48-page rulebook, four pre-generated character folios, a double-sided fold-out map, a pack of Star Wars dice, and tokens to track destiny points, characters, and vehicles.

You can buy it at Amazon.

  • “This system led to some really fun and interesting situations that, as the GM, had me pushing my creative storytelling to keep the adventure moving and the players problem solving skills.” — Joseph Siemsen, Marooner’s Rock

The Core Rulebook

This 464-page book includes everything you need to run a full Age of Rebellion campaign, with the exception of Star Wars dice.

You can buy the Core Rulebook and dice at Amazon.

Force and Destiny

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Luke Skywalker is the prototypical Jedi of Episodes IV through VI, but he is not the only one. Jedi can fight the Empire, take on criminal syndicates, hunt down the Sith, free the enslaved – there are many wrongs to right in the conflicted and confused galaxy.

In Force and Destiny players can take the role of Consulars, Guardians, Mystics, Seekers, Sentinels, or Warriors. The core rulebook defines three specializations for each career (ex: Pathfinder Seeker), so there are 18 character types. Player characters can be Cerean, Human, Kel Dor, Mirialan, Nautolan, Togruta, Twi’ilek, or Zabrak.

The Morality mechanic is hugely important in Force and Destiny. It is affected by and affects a character’s use of The Force, and it helps define her personality and relationship to The Force. Every character has a Morality strength (ex: Compassion) and a weakness (ex: Recklessness), and a Morality score, which moves up or down on the basis of that character’s actions.

This game is all about The Force. Player characters are all Force-sensitive, and their individual struggles to master The Force are just as important as the adventures they find along the way. If you want to play a Jedi, this is the game for you.

The Beginner Game

The Star Wars: Force and Destiny Beginner Game boxed set includes a 32-page adventure book, a 48-page rulebook, four pre-generated character folios, a double-sided fold-out map, a pack of Star Wars dice, and tokens to track destiny points, characters, and vehicles.

You can buy it at Amazon.

The Core Rulebook

This 448-page book includes everything you need to run a full Force and Destiny campaign, with the exception of Star Wars dice.

You can buy the Core Rulebook and dice at Amazon.

  • “…I think Fantasy Flight have saved the best corebook for last; not only does Force and Destiny present great systems for using the Force without adding a slew of unnecessarily complicated rules but it also places a strong focus on drama and narrative…” — John Large, Red Dice Diaries
  • “A lot of care was put into these pages, and you get way more than anyone would expect to get with a core book.” — Joe Lastowski, Acts of Geek

See Star Wars: Age of Rebellion in Action